Sogang News

Highlights table
Title Research Team Led by Prof. Hyeon-sik Cheong Completed Research on the Development of Flexible Magnets to Be Used in Wearable Devices
Writer sogpr Date 2016-12-15 Views 349

Research Team Led by Prof. Hyeon-sik Cheong Completed Research on the
Development of Flexible Magnets to Be Used in Wearable Devices

 

- Opened possibilities for the development of flexible magnetic materials for soft wearable devices
Proved 70-year-old theoretical predictions regarding FePS3 materials for the first time in the world -

 

A research team, led by Prof. Hyeon-sik Cheong in the faculty of Physics at Sogang University, obtained fruitful results from its base research on the “Development of Flexible Magnets for Wearable Devices.” If the methods and research results defined by the team are further drawn out, it will soon be possible to develop flexible and bendable magnetic materials, such as 2D magnets with atomic thickness, as required for soft wearable devices.

 

The results of the research were published in the December issue of “Nano Letters,” a world-renowned journal in the Nano-technology field, published by the American Chemical Society (Ising-Type Magnetic Ordering in Atomically Thin FePS3, posted online on November 11, 2016).
 

Not only electronic elements, such as semiconductors, but also magnetic elements, such as sensors and antennas, are used in electronic devices. At present, active R&D projects are well under way for the development of wearable devices; however, difficulties have been encountered in this work, as the magnetic materials needed for application in these devices have not yet been developed.

 

   If the results from this research are extended to cover the development of various types of two-dimensional magnetic materials, this is expected to help with the development of practical wearable devices. Furthermore, it is also projected that very thin magnetic materials with atomic thickness can be utilized for the development of Magnetic Random Access Memory (MRAM), which is expected to emerge for the next generation of memory and storage devices, such as hard discs.